Bond Arms Derringers

I was driving to work yesterday, sitting in a traffic jam on I-77 really… and listing to Glenn Beck on the Patriot XM.  And I heard an advertisement for Bond Arms Derringers.

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Then last night I was with my wife at Cabela’s and she pointed out the Bond Arms and was basically “Oh look, Shiny!”
Here’s the thing about Bond Arms.  They do make the best Derringers on the market.   They are built with high quality standards, good materials, and with an excellent fit and finish.  I’ve never seen a bad one.

But I’ve also never seen one I’d actually carry for Self Defense.  They are thick and they are heavy.  They are solid chunks of steel weight with two holes drills through them.  They are as thick as a Double Whopper With Cheese.   And for all that size and weight, you only get two shots.  Now, I understand the reason for all that beef… Because you can change barrels and change calibers… tons of options for that.  But every option leaves you with just two shots.

Two from a gun with horrible sights and a horrible trigger, that has to be manually cocked.  How you get a terrible trigger pull from a Single Action Trigger is beyond me.    Combine bad sights and a bad trigger with only 2 shoots and you get something that’s very much Less than Ideal for actual self defense use.    Put that in a package that’s so thick and heavy – you will not be carrying it very often.

Bond Arms looks Old School Cool.  And they are.  Just don’t be buying them for actual self defense use.

A Fisking

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The Havok Journal posted a whine about the gun industry that required some gentle fisking.   I’ve not heard of it before… but it bounced around my Social Medias a bit and caught my attention.

Since around 2008, the firearm industry has taken a dramatic turn.  It hasn’t exploded like some predicted after the presidential elections.

Actually, yes.  It did.  Retail Firearm Sales went through the roof.  So much so that dealers and distributors were emptied of product for years.   To this day, supply of some products has still not caught back up to demand.  Such as .22 Long Rifle ammunition.

Continue reading A Fisking

Lubes

TFB reports that Froglube is Coconut Oil.
Fireclean is Canola Oil.
zMax is Mineral Oil.
Other lubes are petroleum oils.
Other lubes are synthetic oils.
Or oil blends.

Here’s my take:   Use whatever product that you feel works best for you.   If you like Frog Lube, use the Froglube.  Just because someone ballparks what the base oil is doesn’t negate the fact that the oil had been doing what it says it does and has worked well for you.  Nothing’s changed.
Yes, zMax is based on a mineral oil.   No, you are not going to get the same results using baby oil from the grocery store.  Why not?  Because the company took that mineral oil and ran it through some more refining processes and changed it.
Same with Frog Lube.  That’s not just plain coconut oil.  They added some components to it to take away the delicious flavor for one thing.  Trust me.   They also did something to make it smell like Kermit’s Ass.  And to keep it from congealing at lower than room temperature.   Coconut oil might be the base, but it no longer acts like it.  Trust me – My wife and I use Coconut oil for all kinds of things.  It’s great stuff.
The Fireclean though, I will not use any more.   Not even on my knives.   Not because it’s Canola… But because it gets sticky.  One of the shotguns I changed the stocks on, I had lubed generously with Fireclean… a year ago.  I’ve not worked with that gun since then.  You know what I found?
An action that did not want to move.
It was gummed up like it was full of pine pitch.    It took me about 3 Pink Floyd songs to clean it up and lube it with Breakfree CLP.
BREAKFREE!   I hate Breakfree!

So I’m not using Fireclean anymore because of the results, not the materials.  But yes, the materials did contribute to extended results here.

Still… Use whatever you like.  Just use it.   Because even if your choice of oil sucks – it’s a hell of a lot better than no oil.  And that’s a fact.

Strikers and Soft Holsters – A Negligent Combination

We see articles like THIS (Warning: Link shows a gnarly wound on a bloke’s arse) from time to time.  Where a fellow was wearing his gun in his holster and there was an Accidental Discharge.  I’m not calling in Negligent, because the people were generally not doing anything wrong…. Accidents CAN happen, though they are Rare.  99% of the time it is Negligence, but not here.  More on this in a moment…

This sort of an accident almost always involve two things:
1.  A striker fired pistol.
2.  A generic fit soft holster.  Most of the time made of Neoprene or Nylon, but also sometimes of some form of softer leather.

This is a bad combination, a Striker in a Soft Holster.  If this is your carry combo – I would recommend you change it because I believe that it’s dangerous.  Flat out dangerous.   Also dangerous are the use of Minimalist Holsters… any holster that covers only the trigger guard, or strives to be as small and light as possible.    Some of these holsters can break during use, some can let objects get into the trigger guard…. and none of them protect the gun in any way, shape, or form.
There was one guy getting into a car wearing his Striker in a softer type leather holster where the holster its self rolled into the guard so when he sat down, it discharged.  Another guy just leaned against a counter and it went off.  So yes – these guns can “Just Go Off” when you are packing a Striker in a Soft Holster and you are not paying attention.
Really I’m coming to the opinion that if you do pack a Striker fired gun in a Soft Holster – or a Minimalist Type Holster – You are being Negligent.   There is no valid reason in my mind to do so.  You are either too cheap to buy a decent holster, too ignorant to look for something better, or you are packing something different enough that there are no other holster options out there.  Which makes me think maybe you shouldn’t be packing it yet.

GET GOOD GEAR.  A Holster is a crucial part of your Weapon System and if you don’t have a good holster – then yeah – Your ass is Negligent.

The 80’s are now officially over.

Nice!  Another Shotgun Post!   This one though is rather special.   For the last 2 years I’ve been looking for something to replace the Butler Creek stocks, and I finally found something worthy.   Thanks to WTA Member ZeroTA.  He posted this beautiful set for sale for $25 bucks and I had to have them.   Boom!  Paradise Found.
Gone is the Butler Creek folding stock that has been on my main 870 Tactical since the hour I acquired it.   A stock that I had put on every shotgun I’ve owned and or used since my first shotguns.
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Here’s the 870 Tactical now wearing a set of Walnut stocks from a Wingmaster.   They are beautiful and warm, and really add class to this beast of a shotgun.    Once again the look of the Classic Furniture on a newer model just looks flat out awesome to me.

Next thing to go will be the “Tactical Choke” to be replaced by an Extended Choke Tube of something in between IC and Modified, without the spike ends.

Gravity Fields

Being a huge fan of Science Fiction, the actual discovery of Gravity Waves gets me excited.

“If you want to find the secrets of the universe, think in terms of energy, frequency and vibration.”

– Nikola Tesla

The Discovery of Gravity Waves changes the future of what is possible.   Waves can be generated.   Waves can be manipulated. This means Gravity can be manipulated.    We can make Interference Waves, which cancels out other waves… Which means we could create Anti-Gravity.

If we can manipulate gravity, we can manipulate Space-Time. Which means we could have Star Wars/Star Trek type Space Travel. Which means everything we’ve seen in Science Fiction suddenly becomes something very special… It becomes Possible.

The difference between Science Fiction and Fantasy is that Science Fiction is based on what is Possible.

Hardwood Tactical

YES!  Another SHOTGUN Post!   Booyah!

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I’ve been seeing some nice guns that have had the original synthetic stocks replaced with classic wood furniture.  I love the look of such guns so I did it myself.  This is a pretty new Remington 870 HD model, which normally comes with the typical Express Synthetic stocks.  Some classic old Walnut stocks look much nicer.  These old stocks bear a lot of stories that I don’t know.  But I didn’t have the heart to clean them up and refinish them.  So I left them as they were.  Can’t wait to shoot it.
I also can’t wait to do this to my 870 Tactical that is currently wearing a Butler Creek folding stock.
I don’t know what it is, but I grow more and more fond of older guns, older style guns, and classic firearms, that I am of anything new coming out.

I’m starting to lean Mossberg…

I’ve been an 870 fan for a long time.  Preferring them over the Mossbergs, even though I’ve used 590’s as my Patrol Shotgun for some time… 870’s just seemed more rugged and smoother.   Mossbergs have never been known for being smooth operators.   But they do slick up nicely with a little work and use.

20160128_121331Today I put a lot of use into one.  With the intent of purposefully abusing it, and my shoulder, to see which would break first.
I fired at least a hundred shells, all high brass, mixed of Buck, Slug, and various birdshots most of that being #5 and #6 hunting loads.  I grabbed the shells blind and loaded them in no order.  Just a random mix, with no purpose, other than to find any failure in the gun.

20160128_120135What I found instead was an even greater respect of the Mossberg design, and the design of the Magpul stock.   After so much abuse, my shoulder and my shotgun remain just fine.  The recoil absorption of the stock is amazing.  It made the session quite tolerable.   I really do like the Mossberg’s shell lifting mechanism over that of the Remington.  Much easier to load and unload.  This is a clear advantage over the 870 mechanism.  And with the Magpul stock, a clear advantage in the position of the safety as well.

The Most Interesting thing from SHOT SHOW 2016

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This is something I don’t think anyone saw coming… the most interesting thing at the 2016 SHOT Show was a snub-nose revolver.  I don’t think a new snubby has been the most most interesting new gun for the year since maybe the 60’s.  Or when the SP101 came out.
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The Kimber K6 is a pleasant surprise though.  It’s the same size and weight as a S&W 640.  Yet it has a 6 round cylinder.  That’s a significant upgrade.  But that’s really not the point.

The question is if a little revolver is still a viable self defense option.  If the answer is yes, then this is certainly the most viable option.   So… to the question.  Is a revolver viable?
The round we’re working with here is the .357 Magnum.  A cartridge that was the most significant advancement in handgunning since the 9mm Luger.   And speaking of the 9mm Luger, it is the chief self defense cartridge choice these days and the most over rated at that.  Comparing most 9mm self defense pistols to .357 Mag options it’s hard to find an apples to apples.   Generally speaking though, the .357 Magnum will hit about 100 to 200 FPS faster and harder with similar bullet weights out of similar barrel lengths.   This is a big advantage in exterior and terminal ballistics for a handgun.  And you want as much of that as possible.  The biggest advantage though comes in the heavier Magnum loadings with bullets that can weight almost twice that of some of new hottness 9mm loads.
Now combine the flexibility of a wide variety of ammunition for your selection.  Now mix that in with a firing platform that is inherently reliable and accurate.   You trade some capacity in exchange for greater power, accuracy, and reliability.   But is that really a big deal?  kimber-k6s-cylinder-1
Most self defense shootings are between 1.2 and 1.8 rounds, depending on the source of the stats.  What do they have in common?  The 1.  Generally the one who hits first wins.   That being the case, that 1 hit needs to be as big of a hit as you can make it.  So yes, indeed, .357 Magnum is a great option for self defense.
In the realm of small snub nose .357 Magnum revolvers, the K6 is going to be a great choice.  And it’s not just because it’s a +1.  It’s a premium quality revolver that’s priced less than something from S&W’s Performance Center, yet is reported to be smoother.   And the K6 is cool looking.  Solid stainless construction, no MIM, and all made in the USA… and it’s a plus one… Yeah, I really like it.

The Ideal Pump Action Shotgun

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For some reason I’ve been getting a lot of questions about the best pump action shotgun.  Well, here’s the deal… There is no best pump action shotgun.  There’s no ideal pump action shotgun.  It doesn’t exist.  There is no such thing.  Even my beloved 870 is not the ideal shotgun.  It’s not perfect.
c36337ff606aca242fd4fdf763a9f8c8My top Pump Action Picks are as follows:
1.  Remington 870.
2.  Mossberg 500/590.
3.  Benelli Super Nova.
And that’s it.  Those 3.  In that order.  And really, the Benelli if you want the option for 3.5″ shells.  Which is nice, but unnecessary.  But I do like the stocks and the sights.  But not much else.

My ideal pump action shotgun, which doesn’t exist, would be a hybrid of the 870 and the 500/590.
I like the Steel Receiver and the Bolt of the 870.  But I like the Shell Lifter and Safety on the 500.  If I could have an 870 fitted with a Mossberg Safety and a Mossberg Shell Lifter – and use the Magpul shotgun stock – That would be just about damn near as ideal as it could get.   Let’s add good Rifle Sights to it, and interchangeable choke tubes.  That would do it, pretty much.
The Magpul stock on a Mossberg is probably the ideal set up.  Or at least the most ideal set up I’ve handled.  It’s very ergonomic and feels great… keeping the felt recoil under control and keeping the safety right there where you need it.