Tag Archives: Slipstream

Slipstream Styx just blew me away.

I’ve said it before… Slipstream never fails to impress me.  I’ve been running my Glock 23 on a diet of Slipstream since I first got it.  About the time of the Gun Dude’s hosting of the MAG-40 class, I stopped oiling it.  Didn’t need it anymore.  Hasn’t needed it since.

Well, Gundoc sent me a bottle of each.  The regular Slipstream Oil, and a bottle of the new Slipstream Styx.  Just for fun, on a whim, I decided to slap a little Styx in my good old Glock 23.  Holy crap!  Smooth doesn’t describe this… It’s… it’s… creamy.   I don’t know how to describe this… I’ve never felt a Glock like this before. Beretta’s, yes.  Custom 1911’s, yes.  This is next level Glock slickness right there.

Molly Moly

Molly is nice.  We like Molly.

This is a Molly we can get behind.

This is a Moly really don’t like.

molybdenum disulfide

Moly in Firearms has been a popular topic of debate in the Gunverse.  It has good lubrication properties, but it also has some problems.  The main problem that I’ve seen is that molybdenum disulfide offers a road into the metal for corrosion.  Moly is hydroscopic.  This means it attracts and retains moisture right out of the air.  Moisture will attract grit as well, and this can increase the friction you are trying to get rid of.  This is less than ideal. This was explained to me by the late Gale McMillan.  So if you are going to argue with him, you had best know more about rifle accuracy than him.

A lot of people are using Moly on their bullets.  This can increase velocity, help accuracy… and that’s a good thing. Probably the best use of Moly when it comes to firearms.  Unfortunately Moly gets hard (it’s a crystalline mineral after all) and builds up.  This leads to problems, reduced accuracy, and irregular bore wear… which can ruin your rifle.

I’ve got a lot of emails from people who are guessing that Slipstream is Moly.  Gundoc put it best. “Moly is for Chumps.”  No.  We do not use Graphite or Moly.  Or a Mixture of the two.   We don’t like Moly.

Molly however… Shivers our Timbers.

WD-40

I know a lot of Shooters who insist that Good Old WD-40 is all they need.  Maybe it does a lot of things well.  Okay, I know it does a lot of things well… But Firearms, fishing reels, locks, is not something you want to use it on, because it gets gummy after awhile. Read this.  All the way to the end.  Do you really want that in your gun?  Seriously?  You can think of nothing better?
Okay, we all know WD-40 doesn’t really have any Fish Oil in it.  But the fact remains that it’s a Water Displacement product that functions as a poor cleaner and an even worse lubricant.  I’ve been told by a lot of old school gunsmiths that they always use WD-40.  That’s fine.  But these guys were not really good gunsmiths.  The better gunsmiths that I know, will use Kroil.  It gets under the gunk, rust, and stuck parts because unlike WD-40, Kroil is a Penetrating Oil.  And it’s awesome for that.  I’ve used it myself working on several firearms… most recently one of my own 870’s. It’s a liquid tool and does it’s job well for what it’s for.  But again, it’s not a great Lubricant.  If you want a good Lubricant, use Slipstream.

Yesterdays shooting

One thing that I failed to mention… Jim’s .45-70 Marlin was crazy smooth.  The action felt like a Henry Goldenboy, it was so slick.  None of the rough grittyness that is typical of a Marlin, in any caliber. 
My own Marlins never felt half as good.  My Rossi M92 .44 Mag feels really slick and smooth… But not like Jim’s.  He’s been running Slipstream for a long time through that gun, letting it really work in.  Mine will get that way eventually, given some more time.  You feel the new Marlins we have at the store… Slipstream makes a new one feel just plain sad.
Marlin should be using Slipstream at the factory. Just saying.  Because they would then be smoother than a Browning BLR…

Slipstream in Cold Weather

We were asked about the old Slipstream Artic oil we were working on.  We wanted to do something special because extreme cold plays hell with machines… and a firearm is indeed a machine.  In fact, when it gets really cold, lubrication becomes critical just like when it gets really hot.  A lot of oils don’t offer good enough protection… some of them popular weapons lubricants. I’ll explain why here in a moment.  So we looked at doing a cold weather formula for Slipstream.

Pretty much we don’t need it.  Why?  Because Slipstream works to almost Minus 60 degrees.  I tested it on a Mossberg 930SPX by burying it in a snow bank for 3 weeks.  Flawless.  The gun cycled, reloaded, fully functional.    The Lubricant worked.

The Grease, not so much.  Greases are oils with additives that thicken it up.  These things don’t react as well to severe cold.  The oil gets thicker, stiffer, and it doesn’t move.  It’s fine once it warms back up… Just like any other grease.  I’ve tested other greases and when it gets really cold… they just don’t work.   Oil, since it doesn’t contain the thickeners, keeps fluid, stays slick, and doesn’t lose its ability to provide lubrication.     Slipstream STYX also works well in very cold conditions.  Better yet, the Anti-Corrosion properties in STYX works even better because when cold metal warms up, you can get condensation building up – inside and outside.  Unprotected, that condensation can lead to corrosion… inside the frame, main springs, under grip panels.  You’ve seen it happen.  STYX stops that.

Regular Slipstream oil is great… if you are running that you are fine.  No worries.  If you go from Cold to Warm frequently…. say… in and out of a hot Patrol Car, you might want to upgrade your Slipstream to STYX.  Normal activities, you are going to be just fine. But what about Slipstream’s Nano Particles?  They remain completely unaffected by temperature.  Extreme hot.  Extreme cold.  Not bothered.  What can cause problems though is water droplets inside, freezing and forming a physical barrier to movement, blocking things from working.  The great thing about Slipstream is that it reduces the ability of those frozen condensation droplets of moisture from sticking to the metal and blocking it up.

It gets really cold out here in the High Desert country here in Utah.  Very cold.  It gets colder here than it does in a lot of places in Alaska.  I know there are places colder… North Dakota… Northern Alaska…  And we’ve got people there using Slipstream, and they have reported great satisfaction with Slipstream.

We recommend building a fire, putting your feet up, and staying warm when it gets below sixty out there…  but if you really need an advanced Lubricant for temperatures below minus 60 degrees… Let us know.  We’ll work something up.

A failure of oil or logic?

Got this in the email tonight.

From: Joe M.
Date: Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 10:00 PM
Subject: I was afraid you’d say that

The background is, I bought my XDm 9mm N.I.B. on September 1st of this year. I only used Slipstream on the slide rails. I’ve fired 660 absolutely flawless rounds through it and the factory fired 1 that I assume was also fine.  Then I decided to use Slipstream to lubricate almost everything in the slide. I used less than a drop and I applied it with an artists paint brush that is very small.  It leaves a line the size of a fine point pen, so Slipstream was not over applied.

The next day I loaded up a 19 round magazine and went out to shoot. I fired 7 rounds and before I pulled the trigger again I noticed the slide hadn’t moved to battery.  There was a round jammed in the chamber and the slide was locked up tight.  No clearing procedure worked.  After an hour I was able to free the slide and get the round out.  The attached pictures are of the jammed round.

I scrubbed every atom of Slipstream out of my weapon that was humanly possible to remove.  I applied M-Pro 7 LPX which, with the exception of the slide rails, was the only form of lubrication on the weapon for the flawless 660 rounds.  I have subsequently fired 75 rounds, using only M-Pro 7 LPX, without any further problems at all.

The facts of my experience indicate your product is crap.  I bought your oil and grease combo. I considered using them on a rusty old lawnmower I have, but I decided the best use for your products is to put them in the trash.

Have you got anything to say for yourself?

Joe M.

What do I have to say for myself?  I think you didn’t use enough Slipstream.  Here’s the deal… you used a very tiny amount of Slipstream… one applied in such a way as to almost insure that none of the Slipstream Particles really got into your gun and you only had a tiny bit of the carrier oil, which is of a similar composition to your beloved MPRO7.   To say that Slipstream is what caused this jam is a complete failure of logic.  You didn’t use enough to be either good or bad.  You had a bad round.  Simple as that.  To get what you described we would have to use Super Glue as our carrier oil, and other folks – pretty much everyone that used it – would have the same results.  Not a really good way to promote a lubricant, eh?  Go get your Slipstream, and apply it the way we suggested.  Shake it up, and pour it on generously.   Sorry you had a bad round of Ammunition, but we don’t make Ammunition.  I suggest you take this issue up with whoever did.

Slipstream is being used by US Forces all around the world.  Iraq, Afghanistan, Japan… Army Infantry, Marine Infantry, Airforce EOD, Navy mechanics…   and thousands of shooters around the country.   And you think oil is what caused your NIB XD 9mm to lock up like it was glued.  Uh huh.

Guys, is it at all possible in any way shape or form that a tiny amount of oil, any oil, applied in the manner indicated, could have caused this?  Or do you think it could possibly be a bad round of ammunition?  Which is more likely?

SLIPSTREAM STYX

Crusader Weaponry is proud to announce the official launch of Slipstream Styx.

Styx is our Maritime formula.  Designed to provide not just the ultimate in lubrication, but also the best in corrosion protection.  We designed this stuff for our Marine warrior brothers, for our brothers in the Sheriff’s Departments and Police Departments in Coastal areas.  Styx would be absolutely perfect for Somali Pirates – but we wont sell it to them.  The guys that hunt Somali Pirate, however… this is the stuff for you.  Coast Guard’s Law Enforcement and Drug Interdiction guys – this stuff is for you.  Virginia Beach Police – this stuff is for you.  For you guys packing Concealed Carry in Atlanta Georgia where you can get all kinds of hot and sweaty… This stuff is for you too.

Slipstream Styx.  Your unfair advantage. Get it in your gun.

Crusader Weaponry is Awesome

These are some of our Broadswords.  SR-25 Type .308 rifles and carbines that give Precision Accuracy with Reliability, these will go toe to toe against rifle systems that cost twice as much… and then spank them.  These guns shoot like you are shooting a 556 weapon… and our 556 weapons shoot so soft you think your shooting a rifle with a .22LR kit in it except they don’t jam.

Our Slipstream is also being used on Robots in the War Zone… it makes every mechanical system it’s applied to run better.