Category Archives: Weapons

Buck’s 110 Slim Hunter Pro

In 1964 Buck Knives introduced the Model 110 Folding Hunter. The knife that became not just a classic, but the most popular folding knife ever made. It has handsome lines, and sharp looking brass bolsters with wood scales. And the blade locked, which was practically a novelty then. The knife proved to be a strong and reliable tool that every outdoorsman wanted.
The problem that it has though, is that it’s rather heavy unless you carry it in the belt sheath… Because you had to. Some years ago, Buck made a Ecolite version, which was much lighter and better suited for everyday carry. But some guys didn’t like the Paperstone scales, and it didn’t have a clip. I for one love the Ecolite and wish they still made them.

Buck has now released the Slim Hunter Pro version which takes even more weight out of the knife, and adds that Pocket Clip we’ve been waiting for. And the name is quite fitting… The knife is very slim, and very light, and it works incredibly well for the purpose of packing every day and all day. It also adds something we’ve wanted all along too. Thumb Studs for easy one handed opening.

Now, I know someone in the comments will say that you could always open a 110 Folding Hunter one handed, easily. By gripping the blade and flicking the handle down. Yes. And I’ve also seen guys flick that knife across the room when they lost their grip doing just that. I’m talking about safely and securely opening the knife. And I love the way it opens too… With an authoritative snap when the lock engages. It’s satisfying in the same way a pump action shotgun is satisfying when you rack the slide. It gives you that feedback and confidence that work is about to get done.

The Elephant in the room though, is that pocket clip. It’s works fine, and gives a nice deep carry. It doesn’t make any hot spots really in the hand when you are using the knife. It’s a good clip functionally. The problem though is that it’s this huge fat thing that detracts from the simple elegance of the 110 design. If someone out there was in the business of making replacement clips, something that could replace this thing would be a winner product to make. Because I’d buy one in a heartbeat.

The blade is 3.75 inches long, with an overall knife length opened, of just over 8 inches. The steel isn’t the normal 440HC BOS. This stuff is the upper scale blade steel, CPM-S30V. Which is fantastic stuff without being too expensive. And then Buck takes that blade and gives it the BOS heat treat process which involves cryogenic treatment to improve the steel even more. The blade shape is reminiscent of the classic 110 Folding Hunter, but slightly different as it doesn’t have as much of a Bowie style recurve to the clip-point profile. So the knife doesn’t quite have as much of that needle point tip as the old school version, but is still a handsome looking blade.

Buck makes Slim Hunter Pro version of their 112 series as well… Which is just like this but with a shorter blade and even better suited for Every Day Carry than the full sized 110. The 112 version is a great option for those that are considering the Benchmade Bugout, but would rather buy something else due to Benchmade’s political SNAFU.

Both versions and different color options can be found at BladeHQ. Amazon, or other fine retailers. This is the knife I’ve been waiting for Buck to make for a very long time. 30 years? I’m glad it’s finally here. I recommend these knives highly. While they are a little spendy compared to the classic Folding Hunter, these knives are certainly better suited to our modern lifestyle and knife habits. Also, these knives are made right here in the USA so your money is going to support American families and not a foreign government that wants to bloody our nose and overthrow the world under their communist flag.

Benchmade 535 Bugout

The Bugout is named inaccurately. Bugging out to me, means it’s a SHTF scenario. Where you are going to deal with everything from Aliens to Zombies to Survival. That kind of knife is probably better off being a Fixed Blade, and maybe a large one at that. That’s really not what this knife is all about. What this knife really is, is a more butch Gentleman’s knife.

The Bugout sports a thin flat grind blade that’s very sharp and awesome for slicing. The handle profile is also very thin. The clip allows for a very deep carry. And the overall weight is under 2 ounces, making it just crazy light. Saying that “It’s like it’s not even there” is an understatement. And like a Gentleman’s knife, the Bugout is on the smallish side.

The liners are very short, to reduce weight. And the knife is mostly open. But the Axis lock is smooth, and just what you would expect of a Benchmade. I do like the design and the execution. And I do feel that you are getting what you pay for with the Bugout… if you went into it with proper expectations. Because the knife was designed from the start to be crazy light, it gives up some things that a true SHTF Bug Out Knife should have. The blade isn’t heavy enough to flick out with a snap of the wrist. But it does open smoothly with the thumb stud, and you can flick it out with the studs with a little practice. You are getting a coated titanium Axis lock, which means it’s very light, and it’s going to last for a very long time. As will the reinforced nylon scales… Though they can flex if you squeeze it, it’s not going to hurt them. And you can get kits to swap those with G-10 or Micarta, if you want to add some thickness and weight. Which defeats the purpose of the Bugout’s super light nature. It’s fine as it is. Right now, you can get the plan satin blade with blue handles, or a tan handle with a black coated blade. But I tend to not light coated blades… so… Blue. Which looks nice enough.

I find it odd that this was marketed at guys that are doing backpacking and are counting every ounce. No. That’s really not this knife. This is better suited to the guy that wears a suit every day and suit pants pockets don’t hang heavy folders very well. But I guess the name “Professional” or “Middle Management” or “Sales Team” just doesn’t inspire, and probably doesn’t show the handle materials that those names might conjure… Like Rich Mahogany or Corinthian Leather. But the S30V Blade Steel sure does. That’s a solid choice, without getting silly in expense. As is the Bugout knife as a whole. A solid choice for the guy that wants a really good every day carry knife that is light and deep, yet capable of good cutting when needed.

The Bugout is worthy of the Butterfly… Benchmade really does make some great knives, and this is one of them.

UPDATE: Some time later after packing the Bugout for some time… It’s become my favorite EDC Folding Knife. The fact it does very well at not being there when not needed, and being handy and sharp as hell when needed… It’s damn near the Perfect EDC knife. I love this thing.

Glock Model 45 Quick Take

I’ve handled the Glock Model 45, but haven’t fired it… But I have fired the Glock 19X. Here’s my take on the G45: It’s the best handgun Glock has ever made. Period. It takes that “Glock Commander” form factor that make the 19X a pleasure to shoot, but improves it. True Glock Gen 5 features, forward slide serrations, and no droopy lip on the bottom of the front strap like on the 19X. And no lanyard. All you need to do to the G45 is to put Night Sights on it. Done. It’s the first Glock that I’ve ever looked forward to seeing hit production.

Gerber Flatiron

I’ve done something I honestly never thought I’d do. I picked up a Gerber. I’ve been kind of interested in Cleaver Blade folders, and this one just stood out to me. Now, I’m just not a fan of Gerber… Their designs, their Chinese production… and this one is Chinese made too. Damn it. I seriously find that irritating and I strongly dislike Gerber for that reason. I make no excuses for getting this knife… I have Sinned. Forgive me. But this knife is pretty cool…

SIG M11-A1 a Unicorn captured.

The SIG M11-A1 has been one of my Unicorn pistols for some time.  It’s basically the latest version of the P228 that’s no longer in production.  I had used a 228 many moons ago as duty weapon when I did patrol work.  The M11-A1 simply adds factory night sights, the SRT trigger, and that’s about it.  If you are unfamiliar with the 228, that’s a shame.  But it’s what the 229 became with the addition of a frame rail.  The M11-A1 keeps the lines clean by being free of rails.  
Now, a lot of new Shooters out there might not know anything about the M11.  In the 80’s when the US Army adopted the Beretta M9 pistol as the service pistol, they quickly found that it did not meet the needs of everyone that needed a pistol.  So the Army adopted the M11 shortly thereafter. 
The M11 was primarily issued to Investigators and other DOD Agents that needed something concealable.  It also found its way into the hands and holsters of Aviators and others that the M9 was too large for.  The M11 has been quietly seeing service ever since the late 80’s
During that time, the civilian P228 was gaining popularity with Law Enforcement and I remember if a LEO wasn’t packing a Beretta, it was 226 or a 228.  I myself carried a 228 on duty until I switched to an HK USP, a decision that I do not regret.  But I did regret giving up the 228 from my arsenal.  It was a good balance of size, weight, and capacity and really worked well.

Springfield Armory’s new 10mm XDM pistols


Springfield Armory has released the XDM in 10mm now.  It’s available in two flavors, 4.5″ and 5.25″.  The service sized pistol has a fixed rear sight and a fiber optic front.  While the 5.25″ pistol has a fiber optic front sight and an adjustable rear sight.  It also has a big long open port in the stop of the slide, that I’m not a fan of.
First off, Fiber Optic front sight posts annoy me.  I hate them.  It’s a cheap sight and I can’t stand them on any gun I own.   I’d much rather have seen them use pretty much any other sights.  But no matter… I’d put Trijicon HD’s on these things regardless.  I’d also liked to have seen a threaded barrel.  Or at least throw one in the box with the pistol as an extra option.   I know Springfield is just testing the waters, but I’d have liked to have seen them take the test seriously.
What they did take seriously though is the 10K Run they put the gun through… a claimed 10,000 rounds without a failure.  If true, that’s impressive as hell.
I hope that this is a signal that 10mm is becoming more mainstream.
Right now your 10mm options are as follows:
1.  Glocks.
2.  1911’s.
3.  EAA Witness
4.  SIG 220’s.
The EAA guns are finicky, the 1911’s can be expensive and or finicky, and the SIG’s are expensive and can be hideous looking in that camo for the Hunter version.  Is that Kryptek?  That’s the Nickleback of Camo.  Don’t buy that one.
So really if you want to spend less than a Thousand Dollars, really the only viable option for a reliable 10mm is the Glocks… and now the XDM’s.   It’s good to have options.

The Most Unreliable Pistols

I put out a survey and talked to a lot of Firearms Instructors about the most consistently unreliable pistols they’ve seen come through their classes.  When the pattern emerged through the Signal/Noise filters, it confirmed my theory.   Short Barreled 1911’s are the Most Unreliable.   Let’s look at this for a second and see why.
The 1911 family of guns tend to be very reliable.  During the Pistol Trials before the gun was adopted by the US Army, the Colt ran well over 6,000 without problems and thoroughly crushed the competition (Savage) which didn’t even make it halfway.   Since then, it garnered a reputation for being unreliable?  What happened?
Well, for a long time, Colt owned the patent on the design and if a 1911 wasn’t built by Colt, it was built under license and the guns all tended to follow that pattern rather closely.

Continue reading The Most Unreliable Pistols

Benchmade SOCP Dagger


I’ve had this knife for several years now.  And the one thing I can tell you about this, is that it isn’t a tool.  See, most knives regardless of their marketing-defined purpose, are cutting tools.  First and foremost, they are able to cut things and be used for many tasks.  The SOCP doesn’t do any of that.  The SOCP does only one thing.  Stab.  The blade is designed to puncture.  And it does that very well, thanks to its needle-sharp tip.  It does have some sharpening up the sides of the edges, but only to aid in penetration and to open the wound channel a bit.   There is really no other utility going on here.  And that’s okay. Continue reading Benchmade SOCP Dagger

Benchmade Adamas CBK Push Dagger


There’s not much to say about the Benchmade Adamas Push Dagger that hasn’t already been said on many a knife forum, blade magazine, or YouTube Video… at least when they first came out.  Really not much about them ever since.  And I find that a little curious.  Because this knife is with me quite often.  Even into places where weapons are strictly verboten.  It’s a frequent carry item because it’s just so bloody good at being exactly what it is there to be.  Your Backup. Continue reading Benchmade Adamas CBK Push Dagger

Ka-Bar: Classic Military. The Aragorn Knife.


This knife is The Classic Military Knife, and to me, just as Iconic as the Willis Jeep, Leather Bomber Jackets, Thompson SMG’s, and Sherman Tanks.  It screams History, Heritage, and Tradition.
I’m not going to go into the History aspect of it… I don’t need to.  Its been spoken about for generations.   This one is stamped “US ARMY”, as all the best ones are… Just sayin…
Continue reading Ka-Bar: Classic Military. The Aragorn Knife.